Bring It On!

Quote of the Day-March 16

March 16th, 2007 | by Ken Grandlund |

“Any man worth his salt will stick up for what he believes right, but it takes a slightly better man to acknowledge instantly and without reservation that he is in error.” - Andrew Jackson

[tag]quote+of+the+day, andrew+jackson[/tag]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • e-mail
  • YahooMyWeb
Sphere: Related Content

  1. 13 Responses to “Quote of the Day-March 16”

  2. By Tom Harper on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Good quote.  If admitting an error is a sign of worthiness, our current regime is absolutely worthless.

  3. By Craig R. Harmon on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    If admitting an error is a sign of worthiness, our current regime is absolutely worthless.

    Just the other day, Alberto Gonzalez, speaking for our current regime, admitted that mistakes were made in regard to the US Attorneys. Bush, the head of our current regime, a little later, in regard to the same issue, admitted mistakes were made. Quite some time ago, Condoleeza Rice, in reference to the Iraq war, admitted that probably thousands of mistakes had been made in Iraq.

  4. By ken grandlund on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    That may be true Craig, but they were hardly “instantly and without reservation” now were they.

  5. By Craig R. Harmon on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Perhaps not, Ken, but neither does actually admitting mistakes mark them as absolutely worthless, at least by the standard that I perceived Mr. Harper to be applying. Surely, actually admitting error, even if not instantly and without reservation, places them somewhere between “any man worth his salt” and “a slightly better man”.

  6. By Paul Watson on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Craig,

    If they did something about the errors, maybe. But saying you’re “taking responsibility” and actually taking responsibility are two very different things, especially these days (and no, it’s not just the Administration that thinks that saying you’re “taking responsibility” is the same as actually doing it).

  7. By ken grandlund on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Agreed Craig- it is all their incompetance and deceitfulness that makes them worthless. Of course, if you are a multi-national corporation of major shareholder of one, your opinion about the worth of this administration is probably a bit different.

  8. By ken grandlund on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Oh- and ‘admitting a mistake’ after denying it to begin with and only then ‘admitting’ it when the facts are exposed by someone other than yourself is a pretty poor effort at ‘admitting a mistake.’ IMO

  9. By Craig R. Harmon on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Paul,

    Surely one of the errors was telling the investigators that the White House wasn’t involved, no? Sampson says he didn’t tell others how involved the White House had been. Error explained. Sampson exits his job. Something done. I suppose the cynic in me says that’s just scapegoating and maybe it is but Sampson certainly appears to have been part of the problem and his leaving certainly appears to be doing something about it.

    Maybe Gonzales should go and maybe not; I’m agnostic on the subject with no feelings one way or another but that’s not the only thing that will answer to “taking responsibility” or “actually doing it”. That could also be filled by finding out what the heck actually was done and reporting that to the investigators. Now I grant you that Gonzales should have known what was going on and that if he didn’t know, that might be an argument for replacing him (although not necessarily dispositive on the matter, in my opinion) and if he did know and hasn’t been completely forthcoming, that’s a reason to not just replace him but to find out why not.

  10. By Craig R. Harmon on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Ken,

    You make valid points but isn’t that the way with most people? Rarely am I the one who discovers my own mistakes (although I do do that quite often). Most often, and this is true of most people, I think, mistakes are proven by others. 

  11. By Paul Watson on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Craig,

    I wasn’t just talking about the recent case. I’m sick of people saying they take responsibility and carrying on as normal. Not just politicians. Just an annoyance of mine. If you’re taking responsibility, that requires you to actually DO something about it.

  12. By Craig R. Harmon on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Paul,

    I don’t disagree at all. What sort of other specific things did you have in mind? 

  13. By Paul Watson on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    Mostly in my job. When I take responsibility for something, I get it done. When other people at the company take responsibility, I get it done. You can see why it might irk me a little.

    Also there was a train crash here, and the manager said he’d take responsibility. Given previous incidents, I’d be surprised if he did. It keeps getting said, but rarely does it seem to be meant. And that just pisses me off. 

  14. By Craig R. Harmon on Mar 16, 2007 | Reply

    When I take responsibility for something, I get it done. When other people at the company take responsibility, I get it done.

    Well, yeh. That would irk me a lot. 

Post a Comment

Fish.Travel