Bring It On!

Citizens of the World: U.S. Can’t Be Trusted To Act Responsibly

April 18th, 2007 | by Ken Grandlund |

An international poll by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and WorldPublicOpinion.org has found that a majority of global citizens think the United States plays the role of international policeman more than it should, that it fails to take other country’s interests into account when it does act, and that in general it cannot be trusted to act responsibly.

Can we have another big “Thank You” for Mr, Bush?

And in what may be a shock to our ‘America Fisrt, America Only’ readers, the poll finds that citizens of the good old USA tend to agree with their international peers. Most Americans think that the US needs to be more cooperative, that it plays world cop too much, and that the US shouldn’t remain a sole world superpower.

The poll surveyed citizens in 17 nations-China , India, the United States, Indonesia, Russia, France, Thailand, Ukraine, Poland, Iran, Mexico, South Korea, the Philippines, Australia, Argentina, Peru, Israel and Armenia—plus the Palestinian territories- which together represent about 56% of the world’s population.

The following charts show clearly what world opinion is regarding America’s role in the world, our self-appointed position as world policeman, and how much we are trusted to act responsibly.

chart

cahrt 1

chart 2

What all this really shows is that the citizens of the world don’t hate America so much as they hate our government’s imperialistic and unilateral attitude. And it seems the American’s feel pretty much the same way too.

[tag]World+survey, Chicago+Council+on+Global+Affairs, worldpublicopinion.org, US+trustworthy, politics[/tag]

  1. 25 Responses to “Citizens of the World: U.S. Can’t Be Trusted To Act Responsibly”

  2. By Paul Merda on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    At least the Phillipinos still like us… I am not surprised by Israel’s response. Yes indeed, thank you very much Dear Leader.

  3. By SteveIL on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    Mexico is only shown on the first graph and nowhere else. Australia is shown on the second two graphs but not on the first. I don’t know where in the U.S. these questions were asked, and since the company that put it out is based in Chicago, I guess I’m not considered an American by their standards. For all I know, only people in Greenwich Village, San Francisco, and Hollywood were asked.

    France can be dismissed as they have elections coming up and the election of Sarkozy could have a significant impact on this survey. Also, it is likely the same kind of people that were asked in the U.S. were asked in France. Same with Australia.

    Poland is also not in the second graph. Looking at the survey, Poland is very positive about the U.S. Ukraine is kind of sticky as there are so many torn on whether or not they support a Russian puppet government or one of their own.

    The India numbers are fascinating (Page 14 of the PDF file in the last link). This is one in which George Bush can be rightfully thanked as relations with India have improved drastically the last few years (not to mention the agreements that have come from it).

    Philippine numbers: great as usual.

    South Korea: worried about North Korea. I noticed that in a graph about U.S. overseas bases (not in this post) didn’t show any numbers about that. Why not? South Koreans may not like us as much, but I would guess they don’t want our 80,000 troops to leave, would they?

    Going back to Mexico, their numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. The second biggest industry in Mexico after oil is money sent back from illegal aliens. The Mexican government does nothing to stop their people from leaving their country, then bitches at our government about how we need to be “tolerant”. Unfortunately, this is where most of Congress and Bush shamefully allow it to continue.

    I’m not going to comment on Argentina, Armenia, or Peru.

    Russia is too much in Putin’s neo-fascist grasp. China? Puh-lease. How about talking to people in a country where freedom of speech is actually allowed? Indonesia seems to have forgotten how much U.S. money (public and private) for the tsunami. Thailand had a military coup taken over by a Muslim. Islamofascist terrorists are butchering Buddhists in that country and the government there is doing very little to stop it. And the Palestinians? See China.

    Too many problems with this poll to take it too seriously. The leftists and the media will, but they don’t represent all, or even a majority, of the American people.

  4. By ken grandlund on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    Well SteveIl, since you seem to have gone to the original article that was linked, you’d have noticed where they say that not all countries were asked all the questions, so that clearly explains why some show up on some charts and not the others.

    As usual, you assume that since nobody asked you that the whole thing is bullshit. Nice analysis there sir. And your dismissal of the valid thoughts and opinions of people throughout the world exemplifies the very reason why the world doesn’t trust the US. Your egomania about the US in general makes your own opinions selfishly silly, and even the majority of your countrymen who were polled don’t agree with you. But we’re all just a bunch of idiots, right?

    I suppose that a poll saying that everyone thinks the US should rule unanimously would be marked by you as the best thing since sliced bread, and the most accurate at that, right?

    As for all of your assertions about who does and doesn’t matter or like us, I presume that you have personally polled people in those countries to develop a similarly scientific analysis too. Please share with us your factual results, that is if you actually have some and aren’t just spewing garbage.

  5. By Jersey McJones on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    Well said, Ken. I’d put it more bluntly - SteveIL, people like you are the reason the mahority of the world’s citizens distrust us.

    JMJ

  6. By SteveIL on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    Ken Grandlund said:

    Your egomania about the US in general makes your own opinions selfishly silly, and even the majority of your countrymen who were polled don’t agree with you.

    That’s right. Because I don’t know who was polled or where they were located. And it is the majority of those who were polled, not the majority of Americans.

    Ken Grandlund said:

    But we’re all just a bunch of idiots, right?

    Why, were you polled?

    Actually, I have a very healthy notion of this country’s place in the world. I don’t like having it to be a policeman, but when the only other group that could possibly do the job, the UN, you can understand my skepticism, especially since the UN pretty much tries its damndest to undermine the U.S. I don’t want the U.S. to conquer the world; I have no interest in that. But it would be nice if the pieces of shit around the world would take better care of their people or avoid making threats that only leftists would quiver and quake at.

    I also know that the U.S. wasn’t and isn’t perfect. It probably never will be perfect by everybody’s standards. But it still is the best game in town compared to everybody else. Call it arrogance if you want. I call it an American position. Besides, I don’t see anybody else with a better Constitution than ours. It’s only the politicians, the media, and the elitist shitheads who are screwing things up here.

  7. By steve on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    Um… So if you look at the next article on the World Opinion link, what are France, Russia and China doing about the situation in Darfur? Oh that’s right, nothing… What’s the UN doing? Nothing…

    So single out America… they are full of bad people.

  8. By Jersey McJones on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    “But it still is the best game in town compared to everybody else.”

    ?

    One thing’s for certain, we have the most hubris!

    According to the WHO we rank 37th in overall quality of healthcare.

    We have the highest percentage of incarerated citizens in the entire world.

    We have the larget accounts deficit in the entire world by hundreds-fold.

    Wealth disparity currently mirrors that of 1929.

    Personal savings are in the red for the first time since the Great Depression.

    We have the largest trade deficit on Earth.

    Are educational attainment ranking among juveniles is at the bottom of the industrialized world, and university attanment among those 24-35 now ranks 9th - though it was first 20 years ago.

    We have the highest violent crime rate in the industrialized world.

    We have the lowest federal tax rate in the industrialized world, and among the most regressive.

    I could think of a few places I’d rather live…

    JMJ

  9. By ken grandlund on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    SteveIL-
    I think it’s pretty safe to assume that this was a random poll as most are. Therfore, the overwhelming responses towards a certain position should cover a variety of political party mentalities, especially the results from the US.

    Further, as you state a majority of those polled, not a majority of Americans, I suppose we can discard the notion that most Americans believe in Jesus too since those numbers are based on random sampling too. Or, like UN reports, do you only agree with the polls that support your position?
    I have no agenda with putting this post up, merely passing along the news, as it were.

    As you deride the UN again (and I’m not one to claim it is perfect or unbiased) the points you make only back up this poll. The UN is not an American institution, it is a world institution, It’s goal is to create a place for diplomacy. When a majority of the world goes against US desires, perhaps it’s because they don’t share our methods of solving a problem. That doesn’t make them any less effective than any other governmental body IMO. Again, your America-centric POV clouds your vision to a larger reality- that is, the world doesn’t want the US calling all the shots and sticking our noses into everything.

    Steve- And what has the US doing about Darfur? Oh, right, nothing either. What is your point here?

  10. By SteveIL on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    Jersey, who’s stopping you from moving? I’m certainly not.

    Ken, here’s my problem. I’m not so much interested in catering to the rest of the world, nor am I really interested in them catering to us. Over the millenia, the best way of learning about different cultures has been through trade, and it’s no different than today. Not necessarily free trade, but equitable trade. It’s only when greed takes root that problems come about. And like I said, the U.S. hasn’t had the most stellar record. But neither has anybody else.

    You mention that the UN is a “world organization”. So? They don’t seem interested in promoting the rights the U.S. had defined in the Bill of Rights. They don’t seem interested in promoting equitable trade. They do seem extremely interested in setting up some super-governmental elite structure, which will lead to the same type of tyranny as has existed since the dawn of civilization. And while I can understand that many in the world don’t want the U.S. to stick its nose into their business, I don’t want others to stick their noses into ours, including the UN. The UN still represents the stupid Old World, tyranny and governmental control, not freedom or fairness. A country was built to get away from that, but some members of the world community want to suck us back into it. No thank you. Again, we’re not perfect. But we’re still better than everyone else. And everyone else still has a long way to go to catch up.

    Darfur? What has anybody done about Darfur? Bush called what’s going on there genocide at least 3 years ago. The UN still hasn’t done so. As far as I’m concerned, no half-assed measures should be used. Threaten the Sudanese government with destruction unless they stop the genocide and rein in the janjaweed terrorists. Otherwise, give them a few days to evacuate their biggest cities (starting with Khartoum, moving to Omdurman, then to Port Sudan) and then watch those cities turn into rubble. And then the UN, the Arab League, and the Chinese government (since they are buying the oil that allows the Sudanese government to commit its genocide) can pay to fix it. And the U.S. wouldn’t need to put boots on the ground. See how easy that is? Or is that being too tough on genocidal maniacs?

  11. By tos on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    According to the WHO we rank 37th in overall quality of healthcare.

    So Jersey when you need cancer treatment maybe Cuba could accomodate you. Oh wait they had to bring in a doctor from Spain to operate on Castro. Guess they didn’t have a qualified doctor. I wonder if he would do the same for his citizens.Or you could always go to Canada if you are willing to wait.

    We have the highest percentage of incarerated citizens in the entire world.

    See what happoens when you give people too much freedom? They commit crimes?

  12. By Lazy Iguana on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    I thought Bush ran in 2000 on a “we do not need to worry about the rest of the world” isolationist head-in-the-sand Simple Simon view of the world.

    No wonder this man managed to take unlimited world sympathy and support for the USA after 9-11 (shit even Lybia was on our side for a week or two) and piss it all away. He has no foreign policy now, and never did. He ran as an isolationist. And he still is. Everyone is either in lock step with Bush or else they are against America.

    But Bush is NOT America.

    America “voted” for a rich spoiled brat who never had to be held accountable to anything, and who was never told “no”. His first job was CEO of a company that he ran into the ground. Most Americans get a first job working at a fast food place, or a supermarket or something. And NOT as the boss. This is how most people learn work ethics and how to cope in the real world where you are not going to get your way all the time.

    Well now he has his first job where he is being held accountable. He is being told “no” for the first time in his silver spoon up his ass life. He is not getting his way.

    And just like the 3 year old screaming in the airport because he wants more candy but his parents do not want to get out of the TSA security line, Bush does not know how to cope with this reality.

  13. By Jersey McJones on Apr 18, 2007 | Reply

    SteveIL,

    “Jersey, who’s stopping you from moving? I’m certainly not.”

    I don’t give a rat’s ass what you would or wouldn’t stop me from doing. All I’m saying is that the USA is not the fuckin’ utopia you make it out to be.

    Tos,

    “So Jersey when you need cancer treatment maybe Cuba could accomodate you.”

    I wish.

    “Or you could always go to Canada if you are willing to wait.”

    If I had to wait any longer than I already do now, I’d take up fine knitting.

    “See what happoens when you give people too much freedom? They commit crimes.”

    Wow. I never knew you were a member of the Taliban, Tos. Say “Hi” to Allah for me.

    JMJ

  14. By SteveIL on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Jersey, compared to every other country, yeah, the U.S. is “utopia”.

  15. By Tom Baker on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    SteveIL

    Hardly. Utopia? What are you smoking? I’ve lived in or been to a large chunk of the “western world” and let me tell you, this isn’t utopia by a long stretch. We aren’t better (or worse) than the vast majority of countries in western Europe or Canada.

    It’s great you think we are perfect. Your stupid answers of move out if you don’t like it are ignorant. People like Jersey, myself and many others don’t feel like moving is the answer - we feel like fixing the porblems. Your argument is the equivalent of your kid has a problem so you solve it by throwing him out and breeding another. Or at my kindest it’s the same as ignoring the problem all together and saying he’s fine all the way up until he crashes and burns.

    Shameful.

  16. By Paul Watson on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    SteveIL,
    So you’ve got worse educastion, worse healthcare, higher crime, more violent crime, a higher gap between rich and poor, and less vacation, but you’re much better than the rest of the world? Please explain how you figure that.

  17. By tos on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Jersey you are so full of crap. You would rather go to Cuba for medical treatment?
    You tell me to move from LI,you are free to move out of the country. Castro would love to have an America hater in his midst.
    “We have the highest percentage of incarerated citizens in the entire world.”
    And if they were allowed to vote the dems would win EVERY election.

  18. By steve on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Love is but the song we sing,
    And fear’s the way we die
    You can make the mountains ring
    Or make the angels cry
    Know the dove is on the wing
    And you need not know why

    C’mon people now,
    Smile on your brother
    Ev’rybody get together
    Try and love one another right now

    Some will come and some will go
    We shall surely pass
    When the one that left us here
    Returns for us at last
    We are but a moments sunlight
    Fading in the grass

    C’mon people now,
    Smile on your brother
    Ev’rybody get together
    Try and love one another right now

    If you hear the song I sing,
    You must understand
    You hold the key to love and fear
    All in your trembling hand
    Just one key unlocks them both
    It’s there at your command

    C’mon people now,
    Smile on your brother
    Ev’rybody get together
    Try and love one another right now
    Right now
    Right now!

  19. By manapp99 on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    It is not surprising that the rest of the world does not like us as the “policemen of the world”. It is kind of like the people in general and their feelings of police. Many do not like cops until they need one. Most are to some degree fearful of police. For instance if you are driving and see a cop pull in behind you there is, for most, a certain fear of being pulled over for some damn thing or another. Yet we still are in favor of having the police there. Just not there there. Like in our face there. This does not mean that cops are bad, quite the opposite, they do reflect however that there is a need for someone to deal with a criminal element that we all wish were not there and therefore wish that there were no need for police. The presence of police by itself reminds us of the need for a barrier between good and evil. I doubt the rest of the world would want us to quit our role of policeman for the world any more than US citizens would want the cops to be gone from our lives.

  20. By manapp99 on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Paul asks SteveIL:

    “SteveIL,
    So you’ve got worse educastion, worse healthcare, higher crime, more violent crime, a higher gap between rich and poor, and less vacation, but you’re much better than the rest of the world? Please explain how you figure that.”

    Paul, then why are so many going to such desperate measures to come here? From all parts of the world. Can you name another country that so many demean yet would love to live in? As far as education is concerned, the rest of the world lives better lives due in large part to inventions of the yanks. But hey, don’t bother to thank us. Just being here for you is all the thanks we need. When one of the info babes from the MSM (can’t remember which network) went to Iran she showed young people chanting death to America but said that off camera they would ask to be taken back to the USA. Go figure.

  21. By Paul Watson on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    manapp,
    Because they can make a lot of money then go home to spend it. Incidentally, the largest group of immigrants to the UK is Americans, so maybe your country isn’t so good after all?

    And as the computer and jet engine were invented in the UK, perhaps you’d like to thank us a bit, too given that you stole them off us? (Ok, I’ll give you the jet engine was actually purchased following a moronic decision by our government, but the computer you guys nicked) ;-)
    As for Iran, how else are they going to get into the country to destroy you from within? ;-)
    Look, America is a fine place. I wouldn’t personally like to live there because I’m happy where I am. America is not a hellhole or the armpit of the world, but it isn’t the shining city on the hill either. It’s just a country like any other. Better in some ways, worse in others. Just like everybody else.

  22. By manapp99 on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Paul, yes they come to make money, but they don’t go home. Not wanting to open up the can of worms about whether that is good or bad, just that it is a fact. I agree that the US is just a country, good and bad, it is just that a lot of what we here is about our bad side. This is nothing new, but for me, I don’t care for the rest of the world’s anti US sentiment. As for the computer, I did not know that it was invented in the UK however congrats on putting the electricity Edison brought the world for this achievement. I don’t know the numbers but I wonder if there are more Brits migrating to the US or more Americans to the UK?

  23. By ken grandlund on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Great commenting here folks. Just a reminder though that this survey wasn’t asking whether people “liked Americans” but rather what they thought about American involvement in the world. They weren’t asked if they would like to live here either. Just about how America’s governmental choices affect their lives. And for the most part, people around the world want to have our input and assistance, just in a more cooperative manner.

    As for the notion that America is some kind of holy nation because so many want to come here, well look at their alternatives. And recognize that US foreign policy (and of course other western nations) has played a big role in the way those countries are today.

    It is true that we are better than some, worse than others. But our dominance exacerbates our best and worst more than other nations actions do. We need to be more mindful of how we act because we are dominant now. And because we won’t always be dominant, or at least not the sole major power in the world.

  24. By manapp99 on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Paul, no we will not always be the sole superpower, however I think as the current superpower we have done far greater good in the world than bad. We are in the forefront everytime there is a disaster even in countries we differ with. Remember the earthquake in Iran and we offered to send help only to have it rejected by the government of Iran. We are overwhelmingly a good caring people and do not deserve the ire or scorn of the world. Yes, our leaders have made mistakes but I believe that even they have had what they believe the best interests for good in their intentions. World relations are extremely complex and unpredictable but it is evident by the fact that even when we have defeated an enemy that attacked us first, such as Japan, we still did enslave or take ownership of them. Instead we helped them rebuild and allowed them to continue as a free nation.

  25. By manapp99 on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    Sorry, I mean Ken.

  26. By SteveIL on Apr 19, 2007 | Reply

    First off, Tom, I didn’t say the U.S. was utopia, I said compared to the rest of the world it is. Second, you need to re-read my comments. I’ve never said the U.S. was perfect, nor even imply that it ever was. But, show me a country like ours, that can defend itself with overwhelming military might, is still where almost all important technological breakthroughs can occur and thrive, and that has a Constitution like ours. I challenge anybody to come up with that one.

    Tom Baker said:

    Your stupid answers of move out if you don’t like it are ignorant. People like Jersey, myself and many others don’t feel like moving is the answer - we feel like fixing the porblems.

    Oh, really? Did you read what Jersey wrote in comment #7?

    I could think of a few places I’d rather live…

    He mentioned he’d rather live somewhere else, and I mentioned that I wasn’t going to stop him.

    As far as how you all want to fix problems? We’ve seen enough of “liberals” “fixing” problems for the last 70 years. Granted, the Republicans did nothing to fix the “fixes”, but that’s because there are not enough real conservatives in the Republican Party on Capitol Hill (and none in the Democratic Party), or in the White House. Even Reagan couldn’t get his agenda in place because of all the damn leftist Democrats on the Hill. “Liberal” fixes to problems lead to further failure and more problems for everyone. Just take a look at how the western European governments are “fixing” their problems, and making things worse for themselves. Canada’s getting better because the Canadian people are slowly weening themselves of the Liberals and the stupid nanny-state liberalism that leftists were imposing. Time the U.S. did the same.

    Paul Watson said:

    SteveIL,
    So you’ve got worse educastion, worse healthcare, higher crime, more violent crime, a higher gap between rich and poor, and less vacation, but you’re much better than the rest of the world? Please explain how you figure that.

    All that crappy and overwhelmingly expensive nanny-state policy is destroying your government’s ability to defend its people or help its allies. Remember the British Navy (and I don’t mean the recent incident with Iran)? Thanks to the growing expense of every other failed policy, the British government is cutting the size of your Navy. You think anybody in the EU is going to pick up the slack, or even help with NATO operations? Hell, we can barely get France to help in Afghanistan. Maybe if Sarkozy becomes President of France, things will get better; but not while Chirac is in there or if another leftist is elected. So that leaves it to the U.S. Again.

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