Bring It On!

The Beginning of the End For Both Political Parties?

June 15th, 2007 | by Ken Grandlund |

Sure, it’s another round of poll results, but two recent polls show that Americans, in large numbers, don’t support President Bush, the Congress, or either major political party to put this country back on “the right track,” regardless of what that track may be.

The main thrust of discontent seems to be Iraq. Okay, no big surprise there. But other political policies being bandied about by both parties, on topics from immigration to health care to energy policy, seem so far from what the majority of American’s want to see, that Jane and Joe Voter are increasingly saying that their government no longer is representative of them and that the country is heading the wrong way.

This article has results from the polls, all of them indicating that the average American citizen has had enough of “politics as usual.” Or, as NBC news anchor Brian Williams commented, these numbers show that we are in a “volatile period in modern American history,” in which the mood of the population has turned “decidedly grim and downright angry.”

That sums it up pretty well, I think.

And while this made bode poorly for the established political oligarchy and their benefactors, I say hurrah! It’s about time American citizens got over the idea that ours is a “picture perfect” democracy and has some serious flaws, chief among them that our elected representatives don’t really represent any of us. It’s as if we’re living in opposite land where the political classes do the exact opposite of what they say they will do and the public does the exact opposite of what it should do, which is toss all the bastards out and start anew, sans political parties.

But Americans are Americans and not prone to much more than bitching. The expansive disconnect between political leaders and the general public may finally reach the tipping point, albeit slowly. But when discontent rises to such levels as these, and when the people make a resounding statement that things must change (as the November 2006 election did), and when things still stay the same in spite of it all, then I begin to have some hope that the masses will finally wake up and abandon a system filled with corruption.

Representative democracy is a great thing when it works. Right now, ours is just one big disfunctional mess. The Republicans of today have shown us they are despicable scum who put fear and power above service. the Demcorats of today are a bunch of cowards with their own hands in the cookie jar, complicit with the Republicans for our sorry state. But they get their power from your affiliation. They get money from the big donors based on the votes they can pull down based of party alone. You can end this.

Leave the parties, re-register as non-affililated, watch their ranks diminish and their power ebb. Then maybe we can put America back on track. Because these two parties, and their entrenched power brokers, won’t do it for us.

[tag]politics, polls, american+voter+disgust[/tag]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • e-mail
  • YahooMyWeb
Sphere: Related Content

  1. 12 Responses to “The Beginning of the End For Both Political Parties?”

  2. By christopher Radulich on Jun 15, 2007 | Reply

    If everyone believes that voting for third party candidates is throwing your vote away then nothing will change. I personally voted for ross perot the first time. I have no clue as to why conservatives continue to vote republican instead of voting for people that truely represent their philosphy.

  3. By 4Truth on Jun 15, 2007 | Reply

    “Jane and Joe Voter are increasingly saying that their government no longer is representative of them and that the country is heading the wrong way.”
    Voter put in this loser called GWB and they blame the Dems?
    Dems have been in power for only 6 months and first have to clean up the DO-NOTHING Republican budget mess, protect the law (political firings of attorneys) and try to end the GWB War without veto overide.
    WOW - did mr & mrs voter think there was a magic wand?

  4. By abi on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Well said, Ken. We need to get over ourselves, thinking there’s no room for improvement in our system of government.

    Christopher, I couldn’t agree with you more. Voting for someone whom the media has pronounced as “electable” rather than someone who better represents your views - that is throwing your vote away. So is not voting at all.

  5. By Ron on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    “I have no clue as to why conservatives continue to vote republican instead of voting for people that truely represent their philosphy.”

    Oh, Chris, my friend, now you know that most conservatives give a fig for the actual philosophy of conservatism. To them, militarism, mercantilism, and monocultural prejudice is conservative.

    In this respect, they are voting for exactly, exactly who represents them.

  6. By Jersey McJones on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    With the electoral college in place, there will always be only two parties. Their names will stay the same, but their dynamics can, will, and do change over time.

    The Diviecrats ARE the GOP base now, right?

    JMJ

  7. By Craig R. Harmon on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    I don’t know, particularly, what the electoral college has to do with how many parties we will have but I don’t believe that there will ever be more than two viable parties.

    Gee it would be nice if William F. Buckley would run for president so we could vote for a Conservative. Ah well. We can dream.

  8. By christopher Radulich on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Craig R. Harmon

    As long as rhe wisdom is to vote republican because they can win you will never have your dream. The conservative party needs to have their own candidate.

  9. By Craig R. Harmon on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Christopher,

    WFB simply isn’t interested in the job. That’s what’s keeping me from having my dream. :^(

  10. By Craig R. Harmon on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Not that I can blame him. Who would want that job? Not me.

  11. By Lazy Iguana on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Don’t blame me, I voted for Zeebob. You know, the evil alien overlord who lost. Does it really matter if Zeefo also wanted to enslave humanity?

    We need more viable parties. It would make it a lot harder for anyone to usurp a majority. And as an added bonus, very little would get done. We would all be better off.

  12. By Ron on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    “I don’t know, particularly, what the electoral college has to do with how many parties we will have but I don’t believe that there will ever be more than two viable parties.”

    I’d have to agree with you. Craig, I can’t be sure what effect the college has on the number of parties. Duverger’s Law suggests that local majority rule systems inevitably produce two parties, as opposed to parliamentary/coalition system where the proportion of seats is awarded based on the number of votes it gets.

  13. By Craig R. Harmon on Jun 16, 2007 | Reply

    Ron,

    That would suggest that we would have to amend the Constitution in order to institute a parliamentary system where the President is selected by the plurality government or to ditch the single-winner voting system and go back to the original system for electing the President: where the contender with the most votes becomes president and the contender with the second most votes becomes vice-president, regardless of party.

    By the way, completely off topic but I notice that there is still the note below the Reply box and above the Submit Comment button that reads:

    Note: if you are typing html tags into the comment area manually (i.e. not using the editor) please use the “toggle html source” option above.

    Not that there’s any real harm in keeping it but, since there is no editor button-bar any more, the note is, at best, superfluous and, at worst, confusing to newbies. I suggest that we ditch the note if we are not going to bring back the editor button-bar.

Post a Comment

Fish.Travel